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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 25



fovages, who wifh not to be acquainted with any one, and are'too envious of the good fortune of others, and fufpicious of lofing any thing them-felves, for their country is very poor. When the Englifh make inroads thither, as they have very frequently done, they order their provifipns, if they wifh to live, to follow clofe at their backs I for nothing is to be had in that eountry without great difficulty. There is neither iron to fhoe horfes, nor leather to make harnefe, faddles or bridles : all thefe things come ready made from Mande» by fea -, and, fhould thefe fail, there is none to be had in the country. When thefe barons and knights of France, who had been ufed to handfome hotels, ornamented apartments, and caftles with good foft beds to repose on, faw themfelves in fuch poverty, they began to laugh, and to fay before the admiral, € What could have brought u& hither ? We have never known till now what was meant by poverty and hard living. We now have found the truth of what our fathers and mothers were ufed to tell us,, when they faid,—* Go, thou shalt have ln thy time, fhould ft thou live long enough* hard beds and poor lodgings :* all this is now cotoe to pals. ' They faid alfo among themfelves,1 Let us haften the object of our voyage, by advancing towards England: along flay in Scotland will, be neither honourable nor profitable.' The knights made remonftrances refpectiag all thefe circura-ftanees to Sir John de Vienne, who appeafed them ii« well as he,could, faying,—"* My fair firs/it be- - IS


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