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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 64



at arms than he faid it was time to çiarch, for they had remained idle too long. The dejpar-ture was then proclaimed, and they took their march towards Roxburgh, The king was not with the army, but remained at Edinburgh : however, all his children accom-panied it. Thethoufand complete fets of armour brought from France were delivered to the Scottifh knights who were badly armed, and thofe who had them were much delighted. They began their march towards Northumberland, which they con-tinued until they came to the Abbey of Melrofe* where they quartered themfelves on each fide the river Tweed : on the morrow, they advanced to Lambir Law, and then came before Roxburgh. The governor of the caftle of Roxburgh for the lord Mountague, to whom it belonged as well as all the circumjacent lands, was a knight called sir Edward Clifford. The admiral of France with his whole army, as well as the Scots, halted be-fore it, and-, having reconnoitred it, thought they fhould gain nothing by the attack, as the caftle was large, fair and well provided* with artillery. They therefore continued4 their march down the river, towards Berwick and the fea, until they came to two fquare towers, tolerably ftrong ; in which were two knights, father and fon, of the name of Strande. A good farm of fine fields of grafs, with a country-houfe, was hard by, which was inftantly burnt and the towers attacked. Se-veral feats of arms were performed, and many of the Scots wounded by arrows and ftones ; but the towers 54


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