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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 87



• through fatigue ; and, when they wifhed to dif* pbfe of them, they could not find a purchafer who would give them a groat either for their horfes or houfings. Thefe lords % remanftrated ' with their com* mander on the manner in which they were treat-ed, a circumftance well known to himfelf. They faid, € they could not longer endure fuch diffi-culties, for Scotland was not a country to en-camp in during the winter; and that, if they were to remain the enfuing fummer, they fhould foon die of poverty. If they were to fpread themfelves over the country, to better their con-dition, they were doubtful if the Scots, who had fo villanoufly treated their foragers, would not murder them in their beds, when they fhould be divided/ The admiral, having fully weighed what they (kid, faw clearly tlbey were juftified in thus re-monftrating ; notwithflanding, he had intentions of wintering there, and of fending an account of his fituation to the king of France and duke of Burgundy, who as the admiral imagined, would batten to him reinforcements of flores, provifion and money, with which, in the courfe of the fummer, he woqld be enabled to carry on an advantageous war againft the Englifh, But having confidered how ill intentioned the Scots were, and the danger his men were in, as well as himfelf, he gave permiflion for all who chofe to depart. But how to depart, wan the difficulty, for the barons could not obta; my veflels for themfelves and men. 1 Sc 77


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