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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 138



man, and an insignificant bachelor j therefore, t cannot make large gifts; but, if the boon you request do not exceed sixty thousand francs, I grant it.* The princess was anxious to gain the whole ; but the count, being a wary man, paid much attention to all his personal affairs : be-sides, he -suspected this boon regarded the ran-som of the count, d'Armagnac : he therefore continued, * Madam, for a poor knight like me* who am building towns and castles, the gift I offer you ought to suffice/ When the princess found she could not gain more, she said, c Count de Foix, I request and entreat you would forgive the count d'Armagh nac' * Madam,* answered the count, c I ought to comply with your request. I have said, that if the boon you solicited did not exceed sixty thousand francs, I would grant it : the count d'Armagnac owes me two hundred and fifty thousand, and at your entreaty I give you sixty thousand of them/ Thus ended the matter ; and the count d'Armagnac, by the princess's - entreaty, gained sixty thousand francs. • The count de Foix, shortly afterwards, returned to his own country. 1, sir John Froissart, make mention of all these things, because when I visited Foix and Beam, I • travelled through Bigorre, and made inquiry after all that had passed, and what I had not heard before. I there learnt that the prince of Wales* daring his residence at Tarbes, had a great desire - to see the castle of Lourde, three leagues distant* among liS


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