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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 163



-us * There was another ftrong place, near to la JMefen, of which thieves and robbers from all countries made a garrison, called lé Nemilleux; it is very strong, but always in difpute between the count d'Armagnac and the count de Foix;» and for this reason the nobles paid not any at-tention to it whei the duke of Anjou came into the country. •. • * f Sir Garfis, on arriving at Trigalet, had #t sur-rounded on all fides but that towards the river, which they could not approach* and a (harp at- tack commenced, in which many of each party were*wounded. Sir Garsis was five days there; and on every one of them were skirmishes ; inso-much that the garrison had expended all their ammunition, and had nothing left to shoot with which was foon perceived by the French. * Upon this, sir Garsis, out of true gallantry, fènt a pafsport to the governor to come and speak with hiirç. When he faw him, he faid -1 Bastot, I well know your fituation; that your garrison have no ammunition, nor any thing but lances to defend themselves with when attacked. Now, if you be taken by storm, it will be im-possible for me to fave yours, or your compa-nions lives from the fury of the common people, for which I fhould be very forry, as you are my cousin. I therefore advise you to furrender the place, and even entreat you fo to do : you cannot be blamed by any one for it, and feeking forturfe $lfewhere, for you have held out long enoughJ f My lord/ replied the fquire, c any where but • , . here


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