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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 170



With regtfrd to hi's'other neighbours, the kings of Arragon and Navarre, he thinks but little of tbem, for he could inftantly raife tnore men at arms (fo many friends has he made by ' his gifts, ?nd fuch power has money,) than thefe king!* could ever do. I have heard him fay, that when the king of Cyprus was in Beam and explained to him the intended expedition to the holy fe* pulchre, he was fo anxious to make that valu-able conqueii, that if the kings of France and England had 'gone thithér, hè would have been the moil confiderable lord after them, and have led the largeft army. He has not yet given up this idea, and it is for this réafon alfo. he has amaffed fuch wealth. The prince of Wales hkewife, when he reigned in Aquitaine, and re-ided at Bourdeaux, induced him to collect large fums ; for the prince menaced him in regard to his country of Béarn, and faid he would force him to hold it from him : but the count de Foix: declared he would not, for Béarn was free land, and owed no homage to any lord whatever. The prince, who was then very powerful and muck feared, faid he would make him humble himfelf; for the count d'Armagnac and the lord d'Albreth, who hated the count de Foix for the victories he had gained over them, poifoned the prince's mind. The expedition of the prince into Spain prevented hoftilities ; and fir John Chandos, who was the principal advifer and much beloved by the prince, ftrènuoufly oppofed this intended war. The count de Foix and fir John Chandos loved each other for their gallant deeds. " c The 160


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