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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 208



holding from me the sum he has received on my account.' The lady replied, fhe would cheerfully go thither, and set out from Orthès with her at-tendants. On her arrival at Pampeluna, her bro-ther the king of Navarre received her with much joy. The lady punctually delivered her meffage, which when the king had heard, he replied, • My fair fitter, the money is yours, as your dower from the count de Foix; and, fincel have poffe&ion of it, it fhall never go out of the king-dom of Navarre/ c Ah, my lord/ replied the lady,( you will by this create a great hatred be-tween the count de Foix and me; and, if you " perfift in this refolution, I fhall never dare re-turn, for my lord will put me to death for having deceived him/ ' I cannot say/ anfwered the king, who was unwilling to let such a sum go out of his hands, * how you fhoidd act, whether to remain or return ; but as I have poffefsion of the money, and it is my right to keep it for you, it fhall never leave Navarre/ ( The countefs de Foix, not being able to ob-tain any other anfwer, remained in Navarre, not daring to return home. The count de Foix, per-ceiving the malice of the king of Navarre, began to deteft his wife, though fhe was no way to blame, for not returning after fhe had delivered his meffage. In truth, fhe was afraid ; for fhe knew her husband to be cruel when difpleafed with any pne. Thus things remained. Gallon, the son of my lord, grew up, and became a fine young gentleman. He was married to* the daughter IP


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