Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

DOWNLOAD THE FULL BOOK

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 209



daughter of the count d'Armagnac, lifter to the prefent count and to fir Bernard d'Armagnac ;* and by this union peace was infured between Foix and Armagnac. The youth might be about fifteen or fixteen years old: he was a very hand-fome figure and the exact refemblance to his ( father in his whole form. He took it into his head to make a journey into Navarre, to vifit his mother and uncle; but it was an unfortunate journey for hhn and for this country. On his arrival in Navarre, he was fplendidly entertained ; and he ftaid some time with his mother. On taking leave, he could not prevail on her, notwithftandinghis remonftrances and entreaties, to accompany him back; for, the lady having asked if the count de Foix his father had ordered him to bring her back, he replied, that when he set out, no such orders had been given, which caufed her to fear trufting herfelf with him. She therefore remained, spd the heir of Foix went to Pampeluna to take leave of his uncle. The king entertained him well, and de-tained him upwards of ten days : on his depar-ture, he made him handfome prefents, and did the same by his attendants. The laft gift the king gave him was the caufe of his death, and I will tell you how it happened. As the youth was on the point of setting out, the king took him privately into his chamber, and gave him a bag full of powder, which was of such pernicious quality as would caufe the death of any one that eat of it c Gafton, my fair nephew,' said the O 4 • king, 19§


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика