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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 216



pushing aide the tapeftry that covered the en* trance of the prifon, through ill luck, he hit his fon on a vei$ of his throat, as he uttered, * Ha, traitor, why doft not thou eat?' and inftantly left the room, without faying or doing any thing more. The youth was much frightened at his father's arrival, and withal exceedingly weak from falling. The point of the knife, fmall as it was, cut a vein, which as foon as he felt he turned himfelf on one fide and died. The fcount had barely got back again to his apart-ment when the attendants of his fon came and laid, ( My lord,# Gafton is dead/ f Bead.1' cried the count. ' Yes, God help me ! indeed he is my lord/ The count would not believe it, and fent one of his knights to fee. The knight, on his return, confirmed the news. The count was now bitterly affected, and cried out, € Ha, ha, Gafton ! what a forry bufinefe has this turned out for thee and me! In an evil hour didft thou go to vifit thy mother in Navarre. Never shall I again enjoy the happinefs I had formerly.' He then ordered his barber to be fent for, and was shaven quite bare : he clothed himfelf, as well as his whole houfehold, in black. The body of the youth was borne, with tears and lamentations, to the church of the Augus-tin friars at Orthès, where it was buried. Thus have I related to you the death of Gaston de Foix: his father killed him indeed, but the king of Navarre was the caufe of this fad event.' My heart was much affected at this recital of the fquire of Beam relative to the death of Gas-ton; 206


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