Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

DOWNLOAD THE FULL BOOK

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 221



alfo into birds. This bear, therefore, might Jiave been a knight hunting in the foreft of Bifcay, when he, perchance, angered. some god or goddefs, who changed him in|o a bear, to do penance, as Acteon was transformed into a flag.' c Acteon P cried the fquire ; c my good fir do relate it, for I {hall be very h^ppy to liften to you.' 6 Recording to ancient authors, we read that Acteon w^s a handfome and accom-plilhed knight, who loved dogs and the chace above all things. He was once hunting 9 ftag of a prodigious fize : the chace lasted the whole day, when he lost his men ai*d his hounds -, but, eager in purfuing the stag? he came to a large meadow, furrounded by high trees, in which was a fountain, where the goddefs of Chastity and her nymphs were bathing themfelves. The Jinight came upon them fo fuddenjy that they were not aware of him, and he had advanced fo far he could pot retreat. The nymphs, in their fright, ran tq cover their mistrefs, whofe mo-desty was wounded at being thus feen naked. She viewed the knight over the heads of her at-tendant^ and faid, c Acteon, whoever has lent thee hither has no great love for thee : I will not, that when thou (halt go hence, thou brag of having feen me naked, as well as my nymphs and for the outrage thou hast committed, thou £halt perform a penance. I change thee, there-fore, into the form of tfte stag thou hast this day hunted/ He was instantly transformed into a stag, who naturally loves waters. f Thus |t may have happened with regard to JP §/ " • tl\e il*


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика