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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 276



were Lid by the leaves of the trees they exa-mined carefully the whole Spanifli army. They then returned to the king of Portugal and his army, which they found drawn up in the plain, and related what they had feen, ' Sire, we have advanced fo far as to have fully reconnoitred your enemies : they are very numerous, thirty thou-fand horfe at leaft : therefore confider well the bufifiefs.' The king afked, 6 Do they march in one body ?' c No, fir : they are in two bat-talions.' The king turned about, and faid aloud, « Now all of you attend to what I fay, for here muft be no cowardice : we shall foon engage our enemies, who are on their march and eager to meet us : this they will do, for Tire can neither fly nor return to Lifbon. We have left that t0wn : therefore act well, and fell your lives dearly. You have made me your king: this day I fhall fee whether the crown is to be peace-ably mine ; for be affured I will never fly, but abide the event.' They replied, c God afîiftué! We will aH ftand by you.' Northberryand Hartfel were then called, with others the moft experienced in arms, and meà who had feen the greateft number of battles, when they were afked their opinions, as to the btft mode of acting, to wait the event of a battle; for they were likely to be forced to fight, as the enemy was advancing fetft, and in fuch num-bers that they were at leaft four to one. The Englifhmen faid, Since we muft have à battle, and they are fuperior to us in numbers, it is au unequal chance, and we caiinot conquer them but 266


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