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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 289



Thus did the king of Portugal encourage his men, who fought valiantly, and, having incloféd ihe firft comers within their fort, they were put-ting numbers .of them to death. True it is, that #tMs firft battalion of which Iamfpeaking, under ' the command of knights from France and Béarn, .expected to have been more quickly and better Supported by the Caftillians than they were; for jf the king of Caftille with the main army, which confifted at leaft of twenty thoufand men, had advanced to check the Portuguefe in another quarter, thé day muft have been theirs; but .they did nothing, for which they fuffered much , lofs and blame. It is alfo true, that the battle began too foon; but they did ib to acquire greater honour, and to make their words good which they had faid in the prefence of the king. On the çthçr hand, as I have heard, the Caftil-lla^as made no great hafte to advance, for the • French were not in good favour with them, and they had faid,—c Let them begin the fight, and tire themfelves ; they will find enough to do. • fliefe Frenchmen are too great boafters, and &QO vainglorious, and our king has not any per-fect confidence but in, them. Since he wWhss .^at they ihould have the honour of the'day, it .fhftll {be fo ; for we will have. it our own way, or #6t at»all. Conformably to this refolution, ,the Sp^niftrds kept in a large body, twenty jthoufand a* lead," in the plain, and would not advance, w^ich vexed the king much; but he .cpuld apt help it, for they faid,—' My lord, it all over, (though none had returned from tl T 4 . battle : • • 879 .


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