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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 294



francs. When they had thus cleared the place, by putting every one to death, (for none efcaped but thofe who had been carried to the village of Aijubarota, where the baggage and flores were) they again formed themfelves in the fame posi-tion and place as when the van battalion com-menced their attack. The fun was now fetting, when the king of Caftiile advanced in puiffant array, with ban-ners difplayed, and on barded horfes, fhouting out * Caftiile !f and entered the fortified pafs. They were received with lances and battle axes, and the firft flight of arrows griévouîly wounded their horfes, threw them into confufion, and many were wounded or flain. The king of Caf-tiile, ignorant of the unfortunate fate of the van, imagining they were only prifoners, was anxious to deliver them, as you have heard, The battle raged with violence : many were thrown to the ground, and the Portuguefe had not the advan-tage : they were forced to fight moil valiantly* or*they would have been overpowered : they owed their fafety to the impofîibility of being attacked but in one place. The king of Por-tugal difraounted, and, taking his battle-axe, placed himfelf at the pafs, where he performed wonders, knocking down three or four of the Jtotiteft of the enemy, infomuch th^t none dared to approach him. I muft not omit to notice the manner in which the Spaniards ge« perâlly act in war. It is true they make a handfome figure on horfeback, fpur off to adr vantage, and fight well at the Irft onfet; but as 184


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