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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 306



but did not forget what he had told the lord de CorafTe on leaving him ; for, about three months after, when the knight lead thought of it, and was fleeping in his bed with his lady, in his caftle of Çoraffe, there came invifible meffen-gers, who made fuch a noife, knocking about every thing. they met with in the çaftle, as if they were determined to deftroy all within it ^ and they gave fuch loud raps at the door xf the chamber of the knight, that the lady was ex-ceedingly frightened. The knight heard it ail, but did not fay a word, as he would not havejt appear that he was alarmed, for he was atman of fufficient courage for any adventure. Thefe noifes and tumults continued, in different parts of the caftle, for a confiderable time, and then 4ceafed. On the morrow, all the fervants of thp houfehold aflembled, and went to their lord, and faid,—* My lord, did you not hear what we all heard this night?' The lord de CorafTe diffembied, and replied, c What is it you have heard P They then related to him all the noifes and rioting they had heard, and that the plate in the kitchen had been broken. He began to laugh, and faid, * it was nothing : that they had dreamed it, or that it had been the wind.* * In the ê name of God/ added the lady, c I well heard it.' ' On the following night, the noifes and rioting were renewed, but much louder than before 9 an4 there were fuch blows ftruck againft the door and windows of the chamber of the knight, that it feemed they would break them down. ' The knight


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