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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 323



a caftle called Pulpiron ; It was in the poffeflion of marauders, under the command of Angerot and le petit Mefchin, who had done much da: mage to the country round about. Sir Waiter de Paffac had fworn by the foul of his father, that in return for the mifchiefs they had done, he would never grant them mercy, but hang them the moment he could lay hands on them. ' The army laid fiege to this caftle, which is feated on a rock, whence the view is extenfive and pleafant. On forming thç fiege, fir Walter again fwore, he would never depart until he had gained it, and taken all within, who fhould not be allowed to furrender and go away, if they even wifhed it. Many attacks vere made : but the French failed in all, as it was ably defended. € I know not/ faid fir Walter, c how things may turn out ; the king of France is rich enough to keep up the fiege, and, if I remain here a whole year, I will not leave it until I be the mailer/ What he had faid was attended to, and all things neceifary for a long fiege were done. The two captains in the caftle, feeing the French were determined not to depart without having gained it, coil what it would, began to feel alarmed, and thought it advifable to leave it, whether their enemies would or not. They could eafily do fo at their pleafure, for there was afub-terraneous paflage that had an outlet half a league from the caftle, of which the French had not any fufpicion. When Angerot noticed how the be-fiegers had polled themfelves, and feemed refolved to


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