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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 376



This fpeech of the conftable was much ap-plauded, and his advice followed.. It was then ordered, that the grand mafter of the order of St James, in the kingdom of Portugal, and Law-rence Fongaffe, an able and prudent fquire, and who underftood and fpbke the French language well, fhould fet out for England ; for, according to the opinion of the king's council, there could not be found abler men to execute this bufinefs. Letters were drawn up in French and Latin, addreffed to the king of England, the duke of Lancafter, and his uncles of Cambridge and Buckingham. When they had been fairly en-groffed, they were read to the king and his council, who, finding them properly done, had them fealed and delivered to the envoys, the grand mafter of St. James and Lawrence Fon-gaffe, who engaged to carry them to England, if God permitted, and if they fhould efcape from enemies and robbers ; for there are as many, if not more on the fea than on land. Having freighted a veffel called a Lin, which keeps nearer the wind than any other, they took leave of the king, thebifhop of Cohnbra, and the council of Portugal, and embarked for England. The wind was favourable, and they were three days without feeing any thing but fky and water : on the fourth, they difcovered the land of Cornwall. By God's aid, and favourable winds, from which their mariners knew how to profit, they arrived in fafety at Southampton, where they anchored. When they difembarked, to re-frefh themfelves in the town, they were fummon- 366


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