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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 408



mi till ferrice froni his jtege. All the rcl were put to death, for quarter was (hewn to none. Thus were the Caf&lfians defeated by f r John Fer-nando Portelet, though they were at leaft two tb one more m numbers, on à WednefSiay, in the month of October, near the town of •freutonfe, hi the year of our Lord 1384. - • When all was over, and the field clear, our men mounted their hoffes, and gave liberty to al whom the Caftillians had captured : they aUb allowed them to carry away as much of the plunder as they pleafed ; but the cattle, which amounted to more than eight hundred, were driven to the town, as a fupply for the garrifon. On re-entering Trèutoufe, we were received with fo much joy, that the inhabitants could not make too much of us, for having freed the country of its enemies. All who have heard of this battle praiféd us moft highly for our valour. c We had another fuccefsful engagement in the plains of Seville: bût I will firft relate the moft brilliant fuccefs that has, for thefe two hundred years, ever happened to a king of Portugal, and which our king had, about four months ago, when the enemy were upwards of four to one, all of then! excellent men at arms and of high renown, which makes our victory the more glorious. But I fancy, my lord, ypu have heard enough of this1 battle before ; and, being now fnflrciently tired, 1 had better end the confer-fatidn.* " Oh by no means/ replied the duke : c con* te your narrative, for I fhall cheerfully liften to


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