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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.7
page 421



balance this alliance that the king of Portugal and his council have fent us hither, to renew and ftrengthen our connection with the king of England and your lordihip.' The duke faid,— ' Lawrence,—you fhall not leave this country without haying fatisfactory anfwers to carry back; but tell me about the engagement you hinted at, which the Portuguefe had with the Spaniards near Seville, for I love to hear of feats of arms, though I am no great knight myfelf/ and other places, and marched out of Guimaraens to give them battle. On the morning of the 14th Auguft, 1385, he entered the plains of Aljubarota, where he knighted fevers! gentlemen. The Caftillians at firft intended to march directly to Lifbon, yet, after fome confutation, they refolved to engage. The forces on both fides were very unequal : the Caftillians are reported to have been thirty thoufand ftrong, and the Portuguefe but fix thoufand five hundred, befides having fome local difadvantages. The fun was fetting when thefe two unequal armies engaged. The Caftillians, at the firft charge; broke the van guard of the Portuguefe ; but the king coming up, his voice and example fo re-animated his men that in lefs than an hour the multitudinous army were put to the route.. The king of Caftille, who headed his troops, being troubled with an ague, was forced to take horfe to fave himfelf. Moft of the Portuguefe who fided with Caftille, and who were in front of the army, were put to the fvord, for no quarter was given them. The royal ftandard •f Caftille was taken, but many pretending to the honour, It could not be decided by whom. The number of the flain is not exactly known, though very great on the part of the Caftillians. Of their cavalry three thoufand are fuppofed to ^ave perifhcd, and many perfons of diftinction. This is the famods battle of Aljubarota, fo catted, becaufe it was fought near a village of that name/ € After • 411


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