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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 26



• . IS'- two parts* The garrifon laved themfelves in the ruins of what remained, for one half fell to the ground. On this, the Englifh fet up a grand flouting; but, it being now late, the trumpeta founded the retreat, as they imagined they had done enough for one day* When they marched away, they faid to the Bretons ; * Gentlemen* keep a good watch to-night, and ftay where you are, for to-morrow we will vifit you again : yoir fee well what fituation you are in, and that you have nothing to fhelter you from us/ It was fully the intention of the Englifh to re« turn the next day and conquer the blockhoufe with its garrifon, for it was in their power; and in this idea they paled the night comfortably, as they had wherewithal fo to do. There is an old faying, that€ John is as wife as his matter/ which I re* peat, becaufe if the Englifh are fubtle in war, the Bretons match them j for they were equally clear lighted as to what was to their advantage, and what not. They faw, if they wîfhed to avoid death or captivity, there was no time to be loft in packing up their baggage and leaving the block-houfe. They inftantly made themfelves ready, and, mounting their horfes, rode towards Henne* bon, which was four leagues diftant. They a&ed wifely ; for they were not afraid of a purfuit, as the Englifh had not .difembarked any of their horfes. Sir John de Maleftroit and his companions ar-rived fkfefy in Hennebon, the gates of which they found


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