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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 118



hôtel of St. Ouen, near St. Denis, and, with few attendants, travelled to Boulogne, where he hired a veflel, and, having a favourable wind, landed at Dover. He found there the earls of Cambridge and Buckingham, with a hundred men at arms and two thouiand archers to guard the place ; for the rumour ran, that the French intended landing there, or at Sandwich. At this laft place were the earls of Arundel and Northumberland. At Orwell, ; the earls of Oxford, Pembroke and Not-tingham, and fir Reginald Cobham, with three thoufand infantry. The king, and part of hit council, remained in London, where he had intel-ligence daily from the different ports* . ' The king of Armenia, on his "arrival at Dover, was very well received, and conducted by fome knights to the uncles of the king, who entertained him handfomely, as they knew well how. to do. %At a proper opportunity they afked him, « whither he came ? and what were the reafons of his vifiting England ?* To thefe queftions he anfwered,— * that, in hopes of doing good, he had come to wait on the king of England and his council, to fee if, by any means, he could negotiate a peace between him and the king of France. For this war/ added the king of Armenia, * is not very becoming between them: the long continuance of it has greatly emboldened and raifed the pride of the Turks and Saracens. No one now makes any op-pofition to them ; and this has been the caufe why I have loft my crown and kingdom ; nor have I any chance of recovering them, until a firm peace ' l?e 105


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