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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 124



took bis leave, making it to be underftood thathc would never return until he had been in England, al-though his intentions were quite the contrary ; for, as the feafon was fo far advanced, he had no de-fire to undertake it. On his road, he daily received fetters and nieffengers from the king and the duke of Burgundy, to haften him, and to fay they were only waiting for his coming to embark. The duke of Berry continued hts march, though by ihort days journeys. The conftable of France embarked at Treguier, a town on the fea-coaft of Brittany, with a fine body of men at arms, and ample purveyances on board feventy-two large veflels. Some of them were freighted with the wooden town that was to be erefted on their landing in England. The conftable had a favourable wind when he left the harbour ; but, when he approached the engliih coaft, it became contrary, and the farther they ad-vanced the more violent it blew. When oppofite to Margate at the mouth of the Thames, the ftorm was fo violent, it difperfed the fleet, whether the mariners would or nor, and there were not twenty fail together. Some were blown into the Thames, where they were captured by the Englifh ; and among them was one that had two or three parts of the wooden town on board, and the workmen who were to ere ft it. They and the town were fent to London, which much pleafed the king and the citizens. Seven other veflels of the fleet, laden with ftores and provifion, were driven on the coaft of Zealand, and feized ; but the conftable and his lords, Ill


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