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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 134



have efcàpfcd had (he been able, but the doot was fattened ; and James, who was a ftrong man, held her tight in his arms, and flung her down on the floor, and had his will of her. Immediately af-terward, he opened the door of the dungeon, and made himfelf ready to depart. The lady, ' exafpe-rated with rage at what had pafled,. remained fi-lent, in tears ; but, on his departure, (he faid to him,—s. Jemmy, Jemmy, you have-not done well in thus deflowering me : the blame, however, ftall not be mine, but the whole be laid on you, if It pleafe God my hulband ever return/ James mounted his horfe, and, quitting the caf-tie, haftened back to his lord, the count d'Alen-çon, in time to attend his rifing at nine o'clock : he had been feen in the hôtel of the count at four o'clock that morning. I am thus particular, be-caufe all thefe circumftances were inquired into, and examined by the commiffioners of the parlia-ment, when the caufe was before them* The lady de Carogne, on the day this unfortu-nate event befel her, remained in her caftle, and pafled it off as well as (he could, without mention-ing ope word of it to either chambermaid or va-let, for (he thought by making it public (he would have more (hame than honour; but (he retained in her memory the day and hour James le Gris had come to the caftle. The lord de Carogne returned from his voyage, and was joyfully received by his lady and houfe-hold,' who feafted him well. When night came, fit John wept to bed, but his lady excufed her-. felfj 121


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