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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 136



number of her relations ; mi the examinations and pleadings were carried on before the count to a great length. James le Gris boldly denied the charge, declared it was falfe, and wondered much how he could have incurred fuch mortal hatred from the lady. He proved by the houfehold of the count, that he had been feen in the caftle at four o'clock in the morning : the count faid, that he was in his bed-chamber at nine o'clock, and that it was quite impoffible for any one to have ridden three and twenty leagues and back again, and do what he was charged with, in four hour* and a half. The count told the lady, he would fupport his fquire, and that fhe muft have dreamed it. He commanded, that henceforward all fhould be buried in oblivion, and, under pain of incur* ring his difpleafure, nothing farther done in the bufinefs. The knight, being a man of # courage, and be-lieving what his wife had told him, would not jfubmit to this, but went to Paris, and appealed to the parliament. The parliament fummoned James le Gris, who replied, and gave pledges to obey whatever judgment the parliament. fhould givd The caufe lafted upwards of a year, and they could not any way compromife it, for the knight was pofitive, from his wife's information, of the fa&, and declared, that fince it was now fo public, he would purfue it until death. The count d'A-lençon, for this, conceived a great hatred againft the knight, and would have had him put .to death, £ad he not placed himfelf under the fafeguard of the parliament. 128


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