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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 217



drawn with a cord, and hit each other on the vifors, with fuch force that fir Reginald's lance wa^fhi-vered into four pieces, which flew to a greater height than they could have been thrown. All pre-fent allowed this to be, gallantly done. Sir John Holland ftruck fir Reginald likewife on the vifor, but not with the fame fqecefs, and I will tell you why. Sir Reginald had but lightly laced on his helmet, fo that it was held by one thong only, which broke at the blow, and the helmet flew over his head, leaving fir Reginald bare-headed. Each paffed the other, and fir John Holland bore his lance without halting. The fpe&ators cried out, that it was a handfome courfe. The knights re-turned to their ilations, whep fir Reginald's helmet was fitted on again,and another lance given to him : fir John grafped his own, which was not worfted. When ready, they fet off full gallop, for they had excellent horfes under them, which they well knew how to manage, and again ftruck each other on the helmets, fo that fparks of fire came from them, but chiefly from fir John Holland's. He • received a very fevere blow, for this time the lance did not break ; neither did fir Johnfs, which hit the vifor of his âdverfary without much effeâ, paffing through and leaving it on the crupper of the horfe, and fir Reginald was once more bare headed. * Ha/ cried the Englifh to the French, 4 he does not fight fair: why is not his helmet as well buckled on as fir John Holland's ? We fay he is playing tricks : tell him to put himfelf on an equal footing with his adver-fary/ € Hold your tongues,* faid th&duke, cand let 204


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