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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 231



rebuffed by the count de Lerma, faid,—1 By God, you are in the right, and we in the wrong, for we ought firft to have weighed what you have (aid : it fhall be fo, fince you will it," and no one feems to oppofe it/ 4 My lords,* faid the king, 41 beg of you to confider well the advice you give me, not through hafte or pride, but with all attention, that the beft plan may be adopted. I do not look on what has been faid as decifive, nor approve of it : I will that we meet again in this fame apartment .to-morrow, and particularly that you fir William de Lignac, and you fir Walter de Pafiac, who have been fent hither by the king of France and duke of Bourbon, as commanders in chief, do confer toge-ther, and examine carefully ^hat will be the moil honourable and profitable for my kingdom ; for you fhall determine whether we march to offer combat to our enemies or not/ They bowed to the king, and faid they would cheerfully attend to his orders. The conference then broke up, and each retired to his lodging. The french knights had this day after dinner, and in the evening, much converfation on the fubjeft. Some faid,—4 We cannot in honour offer battle* until the arrival of the duke of Bourbon $ for how do we know what will be his intentions, to fight or not ? Should we engage and be vi&orious, the duke will be highly indignant againft the captains from France : fhould we be defeated, we not only ruin ourfelves, but Caftille alfo ; for if we be (lain, there can be no hopes of recovery to the Caftillians, and the king will lofe his crown. We fhall be 218 blamed)


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