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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 257



di (honour yourfelf, by executing any wild fcbeme* if fuch be in yônt thoughts, for you may hereafter repent of it/ * Go, go/ replied the duke ; € thou fhait have neither better nor worfe than MmJ He was then arretted, by thofe who had previoufly received their orders, dragged into \ room, and fettered with three pairs of iron* He was much alarmed, as you may fuppofe, for he knew the duke loved him as little as be did the coaftable, but he could not thea help ké Mews was foon fpread through the caftle and town, that the conftable and the lord de Beauma-noir had been arrefted and confined j but it fur-prifed many that the lord de Laval was not confined with them) and that the duke had allowed him to depart when he pleafed. The ccraftabiefs im-prifonment aftonifhed all who heard it, and not without caufe ; for it was faid, the duke's hatred was fo ftrong, he would have him and his compa-nion put to death. The duke was exceedingly blamed by all knights and fquires who heard of this : they faid*—* That no prince had ever dMhonoured himielf fo much as the duke of Brittany. He invites the confimble to dine with him, who accepts the invitation,goes to hp palace and drinks of his wine. He is then requefted to view his buildings, wherein he is arrefted t never was the like heard of. What does the duke think to do with him ? He has rendered himfelf infamous, for never was there a more difgraceful ad j and, henceforward, no one will have confi-dence 244


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