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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 283



iared on the firft ftimmons. To fay the truth, the common people of Caftille and Galicia are good for nothing in' war : they arc badly armed, and of poor courage* The nobles, who call themfelves gentle-men, are tolerably well ; but t|rfy like better to prance about, fpnrring their horfes, than to bcenr gaged in more feriou* matters* The Englifh arrived about fun-rife before Oreafe, and, having entered the ditch, which, though dry, was deep enough, advanced to the p&liiades, with hatchets and iron bars, and began to break down *©d level them. When this was done, they had Itill another ditch to crofs, before they could ap-proach the wall, which was as wide as the other, and many parts full of mud ; but they were indif-ferent to this, and, rufhing into it, came ta the walls* Thofe on the battlements were not difmayed at what they faw, but defended themfelves valiantly. They lanced darts at the enemy, the ftroke of which is very deadly; and it required ftrong armour to refift their blows. The EngHfh, having prepared ladders the preceding day, had them brought and fixed to different parts of the walls ; and you would have feen knights and (quires, eager for renown, afcend them with targets on their beads, and fight, fword in hand, with the Bretons, who, in truth, de-. fended themfelves gallantly ; fo* 1 hold fuch con-duet valorous, in allowing themfelves to be fo often attacked, knowing well they fhould not have affift* ance from any quarter* The king of Caftille, and the frencb knights, had determined to permit the . „ . Englifh


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