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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 325



It was repprted thrpugh England, that a ne# tax was to be levied on every fire, and that each was to pay a noble, the rich making up for the dé-ficiences of the poor. The king's uncles knew this would be difficult to bring about ; and they had caufed it to be fpread in the principal towns how greatly the inhabitants would be oppreffed by fuel) taxes, and that, as there muft remain great fums in the treafury, the people ought to infift on having an account of their expenditure from thofe whqt had the management, fuch as the archbifhop of York, the duke of Ireland, fir Simon Burley, fir Michael de lâ Pole, fir Nicholas Bramber, fir Ro-bert Trefilian, fir Peter Gouloufre, fir John Salif* bury, fir John Beauchamp and the matter of the ^ool-ftaple j and, if thefe would render an honeft account, there would be found money enough for the prefent demands of the kingdom. It is a well--known maxim, that no one pays willingly, or takes, money from his purfç, if he can ayoicj it. Thefe rumours were foon fpread throughout England, and efpecijJly in London, which is the chief key of the realm, JTo that the people rofe in rebellion, tq inquire into the government of the country, for that there had not for fome time been any thing known concerning it. The Londoners firft addreffed themfelves to Tho-mas of Woodftock, duke of Glocefter, though he was younger than the duke of York ; for he was much beloved for his valour,' prudence'and fteadi* nefs in bufinefs. ' When they were in his prefence, they faid,—* My lord, the good city of Londog ' ' , * " * recommend^ 31t


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