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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 332



added, € Would you have the matter inftantly dif~ patched V c Yes, we entreat it of you, noble king : we (hall likewife beg of thefe lords to take part, more particularly our lords your uncles.' The dukes replied, they would willingly under-take it, as well on the part of their lord and king, as for the country. The commons then faid ; c We alfo wifh that the reverend fathers, the lord arch-bifhop of Canterbury, and the bifhops of Lincoln and Winchefter be parties*9 They faid, they would, cheerfully do fo. When this was agreed to, they nominated the lords prefent, fuch as the earls of Salifbury and Northumberland, fir Reginald Cob-ham, fir Guy de Bryan, fir Thomas ' Felton, fir Matthew Gournay, and faid there fhould be from two to four of the principal perfons from each city or large town, who would reprefent the commons of England. All this was affented to, and the time for their meeting fixed for the week after St George's day, to be hoiden at Weftminfter j and all the-kings minifters and treafurers were ordered to at-tend, and give an account of their adminiftrations to the before-named lords. The king confented to the whole, not through force, but at the felicitations and prayers of his uncles, the other lords and com-mons of England. It, indeed, concerned them to know how affairs had been managed, both in for-mer fifties and in thofe of the prefent day. All hav-ing been amicably fettled, the affembly broke up, and the lords, on leaving Windfor, returned to London, whither were fummoned all colleftors and receivers, from the different counties, with their re- * ceipts 319.


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