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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 351



nbt think on a proper perfon to fend on this errand; when a knight^ who was coufin to the duke, and of the king's as well as of his council, called fir Ro-bert Trefilian, ftepped forth, and faid to the duke,— * I fee the difficulty you have to find a trufly perfon to fend to London : I will, from my love to you, rifk the adventure. The king and the duke, well pleafed with the offer, thanked him for it. Trefi-lian left Briftol difguifed like a poor tradefman, mounted on a wretched hackney : he continued his road to London, and lodged at an inn where he was tmknown; for no one could have ever imagined that one of thé king's counfellors and chamberlains would have appeared in fo miferable a dréfs. • When in London, he picked up all the news that was public, for he could not do more, réfpé&ing the king's uncles and the citizens. Having heard there was to be a meeting of the dukes and their council, àt Weftminfter, he determined to go thi-ther to learn fecretly all hé could of their proceed-ings. This he executed, and fixed hk quarters at an ale-houfe right oppofite the palace-gate : he chofe a chamber whofe window looked into the pa* lace-yard, where he polled himfelf-to obferve all who Ihouid come to this parliament. The greater part he knew, but was not, from his difguife, known to them. He, however, remained there, at different times, fo long that a fquire of the duke of Glocefter faw and knew him, for he had been many times in his company. ' Sir Robert inftantly recol-lefted him, and withdrew from the window} but the fquire, having his fufpicions, faid, * Surely that muft 338


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