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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 359



Ûê .feme mariner the Vety inftant they can lay hafld* oil them : I therefore advife, that the king ufe ri-gorous meafures. It is well known throughout England that he is king; that he was educated by our late valiant and good king Edward, at Weft* tnitifter, who made all his fubje&s, great and fmall* {WÉM obedien#* to him as their king, after his de-Ceàfei which oath the king's uncles alfo took. It appears to many, if they dare fpeâk out, that he is Hot fiow donfidered as king, iior does he keep the ftate or manner of a king; for he is not fuffered to ftfît as he pleafes : they have only allowed him and his queen a penfion, and plainly fhew them, that they have not fenfe to govern the realm* and that their whole council is made up of traitors and evil* defigning men. I fay, therefore, that fuch conduct Is not longer to be borne; and I would rather die than remain in fuch a ftate of danger, and fee the king thus treated, and ruled as he is by his uncles/ The king interrupted him by faying,—^€ What is now doing does not pleafe us ; and I tell you, that the advice you have given feems to me both honour-able and good for us and for our realm/ ' The conference now broke up; but not before the duke of Ireland was ordered, as king's lieute-nant) to march, with all the force he could colled, towards London, to try the courage of the citizens, land fee if, by negotiation and the greateft promifes on the part of the king, he could not turn them to km fa&ion. It was not long before the duke, with fifteen thoufand men, left Briftol on his m^rch to * Oxford, where they quartered themfelves, • and in the 340


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