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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.8
page 374



chargé pu, however, arthbifliop, on no account to.return-without him, for thofe who ate now at-tached to him will be made difcontented. Tell him alfo, not to be -angered for fuch traitors as were near hisperloh, who may have been Iain or driven out of the kingdom, for by thefai his ctowh was In danger of being loft.* ' '• • The* archbifliop Jromifed to accomplifh the mat-ter as well as he was able, and, having foon made his preparations, fet out for Briftol in grand array, fuch as bçcame fo reverend a prelate, and fixed his lodgings in the town. The king lived very privately, " for all thofe who ufed to be with him were either dead or baniflied, as you have heard* The archbifliop was one whole day and two nights in the town before the king would fee him* fo forely vexed was he with his uncles for having driven away the duke of Ireland, whom he loved above all man* kind, and for having put to death his chamberlains and knights. At length, he was fo well advifed that he admitted the archbilhop to his prgfence. Qa his entrance,. he humbled himfelf much before the king, and then addreifed him warmly on the fûbjeâs the dukes of York and Glocefter had charged him with. He gave him to upderftand, that if he did not return to London, according to the entreaties of his* uncles, the citizens of London and the greater part of his fubjeâs, he would make s them very difcontented ; and he remonftrated, that without the sud of his uncles, barons, prelate^ knights and commons from the chief towns, he would be unable tq au, or to have any compliance given •


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