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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9
page 34



'il during his illnefs, by which he ran great risk of his life. You miift know, that there were none fo bold, fo rich or fo* fair, but were afraid, and were daily expecting death. The difordér folely attacked the duke's army, for the French were no way affected. This caufed great murmurings among them and the Caftillians : they faid* € The king allows thefe Englifh to recruit themfelves in his towns, • ' which may coft us dear by ' their bringing the diforder jstmong us,' But others replied, * They -.are Chriftians like ourfelves, and we QUght ^ to have compaflion on each other.' True it is, that at this period a French knight died in Caftille, who was greatly lamented ; for he was courte-ous, gallant and bold in arms : his name was fir John de Roye, and he was brother-germaq," to fir Triftan, fir, Reginald and fir Lancelot de Roye. I will ' relate the caufe of his death. While in garrifon in a town of Caftille, called Segbonne, he had an irilpofthume . in his body. Being yoixng and lufty, he paid no attention to it, and one day mounting his courfer, in gal-loping him over the plains, this impofthume broke. On his return, he was laid on the bed, and all feemçd well, but on the fourth day he died. There were very great lamentations made after him by all his friends : he was defend-ing of them for his amiable character and gal-. lantry in arms. CîrîAP.


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