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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9
page 88



chefs and the fiâtes fuffered a great lofs by the death of this gallant duke. . The young duke of ,Gueldres, who was now of an-age to maintain his pretenfions by arms againft his enemies, began to take mèafures for the regaining thefe three caiiles, which had created ftteh hatred between Brabant and his uncle, the lord Edward of Gueldres. He font perfona properly, authorifed to treat with the du-' chefs of Brabant for the furrender of the cailles on payment of tlie fum they had been mort-gaged for: but the lady replied, that as they were now legally in her pofTeflion, fhe would keep them for herfelf and her hfeir, as her law-. ful inheritance ; and that if the duke were in eameft in his profeffions of friéndfhip to Bra-bant, he would prove it, by yielding up the town of Grave, which he unjuftly detained. The duke of Gueldres on hearing this anfwer, which was not very agreeable to him, was much piqued; but did not the lefs adhere to his plans. He now attempted to gain over to his interest. the governor of thofe caftles, fir John Groffet, by purchafe or otherwise. The knight was prudeat and ftçady: he told thofe who had been feat fecretly to treat with him, never again ta mention the fubject, for, were he to die for it, hf would never act di(honourably, nor be guilty of treafbn to his lawful fovereign. When the duke found he had not any hopes of fucceeding with the governor, he (as I was informed) addreffed himfelf to fir Reginald d'EfooavenQrt, and excited fuch a hatred be-. . * twecn 77


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