Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9

DOWNLOAD THE FULL BOOK

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9
page 98



' . '»7 and to the elder brother of the faint, count Wale* ran de St. Paul, inviting him to come to Avig-non. The couht could not refufe, and, when he went thither, prëfented thofe fine filver lamps which are now before his altar. It was wonder* ful the great faith that was in thia faillit, and the numbers who came thither when 1 wa&'fct Avig-non; for by that city I returned from Fonc, to witnefs this. His miracles and votaries1 daily multiplied, and it was faid he would be canonis-ed; hut I never heard more' about it. * ": Since I have related the death of this holy cardinal, I will mention that of a different pen-fon, for I have not yet fpoken of the death of a king who has fiipplied impie materials for many parts of this hiftory. His actions, however, were the reverfe from thofe of the preceding per-fonage,for by them the realm of France was nearly deftroyed. You will readily guefe 1 mean* the king of Navarre. It is a truth well known, that nothing is more certain than death. I re-peat it becaufe the king of Navarre, when he died, did not think his end fo near. Had he fup-pofed it, he probably would have taken more care of himfelf. He refided iiï the city of Pam-peluna, and took it into his*head that he would raife two hundred thoufand florins by a tax on his country. His council dared not contradict him, for he was a cruel man to all who did fo. The principal inhabitants of |he great towns were fummoned, and, fearful of difobeying, they ' eame. When all were ^flçpibled in the palace? the lpiiig himfelf,'who was a fbbtlé* atid bloquent man.


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика