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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9
page 115



replied Geronnet, ( my fair lord and mailer, that I will cheerfully do, for we are bounden to it Jy your generous conduct.' Bonne-lance returned to the fiege of Venta-dour, and twelve of his prifoners remained Montferrant. The ten -ethers, according to agreement, returned to Chaluçet, to feek, from Perrot le Béarnois, two-and-twenty hundred francs ; for this was the fum their ranfoms had been fixed at. The twelve in Montferrant were lodged in a handfome houTe, and lived at much expenfe. They were not flrictly watched; and, during the fifteen days they flaid, they went about the town to amufe themfelves, and made fuch obfervations on the ftate of it as coft it afterwards one hundred thoufand francs. When the captain of Chaluçet heard of the ill fuccefs of Geronnet de Maudurant, and that he and his companions had been defeated by fir John Bonne-lance, he was very indifferent about it, and replied to thofe who had brought him the news, —c You are come hither to feek for money to pay his and your ranfoms : are you not ? ' * Yes/ they replied, 1 for gain is not always to be looked for.' c I know nothing of gain or lofs,' anfwered the captain; but this I know, you will get no-thing from me. I did npt fend you on this ex-curfion it was your own free election to feek an adventure. Send to, or tell your companions when you fee them, that adventure muft deliver them. Do you fuppofe that I will thus fpend my money ? No, my friends, that I will not, by my faith. I can always have men enough, who will make more prudent' excurfions than ye have 104 .


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