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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9
page 158



and that of the realm, bring about a reconcilia-tion with the duke. But fome of the council faid, € that it would be very blameable in the king to put off his expedition for this duke of Brittany, who was not mafter of his own coun-try; and he might be affured that the knights and barons of Brittany would never fide with him againft the king of France. Let the king, in God's name, undertake the expedition, and the constable, with his Bretons, riiay flay at home to guard the country.' This opinion was ably fupported in the council ; but others op* pofed it, faying, ( It cannot be donc, for the king will never undertake it without the conftable, as he knows more of war than any other knight.' Some argued, faying, c Lçt the king then re-main, and fend thither one of his uncles, for in-stance my lord of Burgundy, with two thoufand lances and feven thoufand lufly varlets ; for, as the war principally affects him, he is bound to go thither, from his connection with Brabant, which is the feat of war ; and he will be joined when in that country, by feven hundred fpearsf and from twenty to thirty thoufand of the com-mon people.'—c What you fay is to no purpofe/ others replied, « for the king is determined to go, as commander in chief: he fays, fince he has been challenged, he will not refufe it. It i| proper he fhould therefore go; and, as he k young, the oftener he bears arms, the more will he like them/—c AH this is well/ faid fome, «but who will be bold enough to advife the king to march fo far into Germany, and among fuch L 2 proud 14?


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