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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9
page 207



there was not a lord in the countrjrable to with-stand them; for Ir William de Lignac and Bonne-lance would not, on their account, break up the fiege of Ventadour, Being mailers of the country, they began their jaarcb through Auvergne, towards Berry, be^ caufe they knew the duke was with the king at Montereau fur Yonne. We will, for-a while, leave Perrot le Béarnois, and fpeak of the earl of Arundel and his fleet, and what they did on quitting the coat of Brittany.. When they Weighed anchor, the weather was fo fine and beautiful, they hoifled every faiV and advanced as it pleafed God. It was a mag-nificent fight to view this fleet of fix fcore vef-fels, whofe ftreamers, emblazoned with Jhe arms of the different lords, were glittering in • the fun, and fluttering with the wind. They floated as it were on a fea that feemed proud to ~ bear them, and which might be compared to a vigorous courfer, who, after being long con-fined in the fiable, gains its liberty to bound over the plains : for thus did the fea, gently ruf-fled by the wind, fwell on with a burden it waji lufljjy bearing, and,. figuratively fpeaking, it may be fuppofed to fay,—' I delight in carry-ing you, and will do fo without danger,. until .you be arrived in a fafe harbour/ The fleet coafled Saintonge and Poitou, and caft anchor off Marans, near la Rochelle. Some of the moil adventurous, to the amount of two hundred, obferving the tide was flowing, en-tered their barges, and failed up the river to the - town


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