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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9
page 230



Yonne, He was, however, well entertained with feafts and fair words* The nobles begged of him io have patience, for he would very fhortly have his bufmefs finifhed; but that the king was fo impatient to begin his march to Germany, he attended to nothing elfe. The duke was forced to make the belt he could of it, perceiving he could not amend it, and, fince he had come to Paris, was refolved not to depart but with the good will of the king, although his (lay was at-tended with vail expenfes. * When it was known for certain that the expe-dition to Gueldreland was to take place, and that a tax had been ordered throughout France for the payment of the knights and men at arms, many of the wifeft in the country, whether of the coun-cil or not, faid that it was ill advifed to encourage a king of France to march -fuch a diftance in fearchofhis enemies, and that the kingdom might fuffer from it, (for the king was young, and very popular with his fubjects,) and that it would have v-been fully fufficifcnt for one of the king's uncles* " or both of them, with the conftable of France, to have gone with fix or feven thoufand lances, without carrying the perfon of the king thither. The king's uncles were of a fimilar opinion i they moil prudently remonftrated with him on the impropriety of his marching with his army, and were urging many ftrong reafons againft it, when he flew into a rage, and ihortly interrupted them, by faying.—c If you go thither without me, it will be contrary to my will.and pleafure; but ' I can ' * - 219


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