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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9
page 250



- - 241 ' much' agitation through the country, and, on their return to Newcaftle, gave a faithful report of all they had fèen or heard to their lords. The barops and knights of Northumberland in confequenee made their preparations, but very fecretly, that the Scots might not know of it, and put off their intended inroad, and had retired to their caftles ready to fally forth on the firft no-tice of the arrival of the enemy. They laid,— c If the Scots enter the country through Cum-berland by Carlifle, we will ride into Scotland, and do them more damage than they can do to us; for theirs is an open country, which may be entered any where, but ours is the contrary, with strong and well fortified towns arid caftles.* • To be more fure of their intenfions, they re-folved to fend an Englifli gentleman, well ac-quainted with the country, to this meeting in the foreft of Jedworth. The Englifli fquire jour-neyed without interruption until he came to the church of Yetholm, where the Scots barons were affembled, and entered it, as a fervant fol-lowing his m after, and heard the greater part of .their plans. When the meeting was near break-ing up, he left the church on his return, and went to a tree, thinking to find his horfe which he had tied there by the bridle, but he was gone ; for a Scotfman (they are all thieves) had ftolen him. He Was fearful * of making a noife about it, and fet off on foot, though booted and fpurred. He had- not gone two bow-fliots from the church before he was ; noticed by two Scots knights who were in converfation. The firft VOL, IX. • R 1 who


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