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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.9
page 286



thoughts, advanced to meet him* bade* him good day, and replied,—* By my faith, Redman, ill luck; for rhàd no fooner parted with you, and wrns returning home, than I fell in with the bifhop of Durham, to whom 1 am prifoner, in - like manner as you are to me. I believe there will ' be no need of your coming to Edinburgh to ob-tain your ranfom, for we may finifh the bufinefs here if my mafter confent to it.1 ' ' We fhall foon agree as tolhat/ replied Red-man; 4 but you muft coprte and dme with me; for the bifhop and his men have marched to at-tafek your countrymeii. I know not what fuc-cefs thfey will have, nor (hall we be informed till their return.' ' I accept your invitation,9 an-fwered Lindfay. In fuch manner did thefe *wo enjoy each other's company in Newcafile. The barons and knights of Scotland, on \eing infortned of the bifhop of Durham's approach with ten thoufand men, held a council, whether to 'march away or abide the event. On mature corifideration, they refolved on the latter, from thé difficulty of finding fo ftrong a pofition to defend themfelves and guard their prifoners, of whom they had many. Thefe they could not carry away with them, on account of the wound-ed, nor were they willing to leave them behind. They formed themfelves in a ftrong body, and had fortified their camp in fuch manner that it couldrbe entered by only one pafs. .They then made their prifoners fwear, that refcued or not they vftnild acknowledge themfelves prifoners. Whçn . 279 •


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