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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1
page 64



ss the city, are often expreffed in his different recitals. Î remark, with regard to the days, that he only begins them when night is completely gone, and day-break begins to appear* With regard to the hours of the day, he makes a divifion of which fome examples, but in a fmall number, are feen in our antient authors, and to which he very particularly attaches himfelf. He divides them according to the canonical hours of prime, tierce, . none, and vêpres ; becaufe, perhaps, he was in the ecclefiaftical profeffion himfelf. I obferve, that he has xipt any where made ufe of the word fexte : what he means by prime, was the morning, the firft hour of the day, or the hour which followed next after day-break. Tierce feems to me, to mark the intermediate time between the morning and midday, which he expreffes either by the word midday, òr by that of none. Afterwards comes vèpre, 4or fa vêprce : it was, as the word points out, the end of the day ; after which was reckoned midnight, Sometimes he adds to thefe words, prime, tierce, none, vêpres, the epithet of bajfe, to mark that the time of thefe hours was near clofing ; and Sometimes the word haute, which, in fome in. fiances, appears to have the fame fignification, and in others quite the contrary. He ufes this mode of fpeech à Ρaube crevant, to fay, that the dawn of day .has but juft begun to Ihew itfelf ; aufoleil refconfant, to exprefs the fetting fun ; à la relevée, for the rime which follows the hour of mid-day ; and à la remontée, which feems to ,me fynonymous to la pêprêe, for.the. evening, the time at which the day agproapiies to its end. ΙΧ σ α 3·/


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