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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1
page 165



AO diflodged, and before day-break marched till they came to the city of Durham, a long day's journey, at the entrance of a country called Northumberr land, which is wild, full of deferts and mountains, and poor in every thing except cattle. The river Tyne runs through it, full of flints and large ftones. Upon this river is fituated the town called Newcaftle upon Tyne. The lord marihai of England was there, with a numerous army to guard the country againft the Scots. At Carlifle was a confiderable body of Welfli, under the command of lord Hereford and lord Mowbray, to defend the paffage of the Eden ; for the Scots could not enter England without palling one of thefe rivers. The Engliih could get no certain information of the Scots until they arrived at this place : they had paiTed the river fo privately, that neither thofe of Carlifle nor thofe of Newçaftle had the fmalleft knowledge of it. Thefe towns are faid to be diftant from each other four-and-twenty Englifli leagues. The Scots are bold, hardy, and much inured to war. When they make their invafions into England, they march from twenty to four-and-twenty leagues without halting, as well by night as day ; for they are all on horfeback, except the camp followers, who are on foot. The knights and efquires are well mounted on large bay horfes, the common people on little galloways. They bring no carriages with them, on account of the mountains they have to pafs in Northumber|an4 ; neither do they carry with them any provifions of bread or wine ; fof their habits of fobriety arc fuch, in time pf war, tot


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