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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1
page 170



places, without meeting any level country. On the fummits of the mountains, and in the valleys, were large marihes and bogs, and of fuch extent, that it. was a miracle many were not loft in them ; for each gallopped forwards without waiting for either com mander or companion : thofe who fell into them found difficulty in getting any to help them. Many banners remained there, and feveral baggage and fumpter horfes never came out again. In the courfe of the day, there were frequent cries of alarm, as if the foremoft ranks were en gaged with the enemy ; which thofe behind believing to be true, they hurried forward as fail as poffible over rocks and mountains, fword in hand, with : their helmets and ihields prepared for fighting, without waiting for father, brother, or friend. When they had haftened about half a league towards the place from which the noife came, they found themfelves difappointed, as the cries pro ceeded from fome herds of deer or other wild beafts, which abounded in thefe heaths and defert places, and which fled before the banners, purfued by the ihouts of the army, which made them imagine it was fomething elfe. In this manner, the young king of England, agreeably to the advice of his council, rode all that day over mountains and deferts, without keeping to any fixed road, or finding any town. About vefpers, and forely fatigued, they reached the Tyne, which the ' Scots had already croiTed, though the Engliih fuppofed they had it ftill to re pafs. Accordingly, they went over the ford, but E 2 with


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