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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1
page 173



what they had been able to procure for them and their houfeholds ; but it was not much : and with them came people of the country, to take their advantage of the fituatioii of the army, and brought with them on mules and fmall horfes, bread badly baked, in baikets, and poor thin wine, in large barrels, and other kind of provifion to fell, with which the army was tolerably refrelhed, and their difeontent appeafed. This was the cafe during the feven days that they remained on the banks of this river, among the mountains, expecting the return of the Scots, who knew nò more of the Engliih than they did of them. Thus they had remained for three days and three njghts without bread, wine, candle, oats, or any pther forage : and they were afterwards for four "days obliged to buy badly baked bread, at the price of fixpenpe the loaf, which was not worth more than a penny, and a gallon of wine for fix groats, fcarcely worth fhçpence. Hunger, however, was ftill felt in the qunp, notwithftanding this fupply ; and frequent quarrels happened from their tearing the meat out of each pthe ^ hands. To add to their unpleafant fituation, it had rained all the week, by which all their faddles and girths were rotted, and the greater part of the cavalry were worn down. They had not wherewithal to fhoe their horfeç that wanted it ; nor had they any thing to clothe themfelves, or preferve them from the rain and cold, but their jerkins pr armour, aiyl


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