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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1
page 178



ceived : and the armies were fo near each other, that they could fee the arms on their fhields. The army was ordered to halt, to confider what / was to be done; and fome companions were mounted to Ikirmifh with the enemy, and to examine the paifage of the river and their appearance more clearly. They fent heralds to make an offer of retiring on the morrow, if they would pafs the river, and fight upon the plain ; or, if the Scots would not confent to this, that they would do the fame. When the Scots received this propofal, the chiefs retired to counfel, and returned for anfwer by the heralds, that they would do neither the one nor the other ; that the king and his barons faw that they were in his kingdom, and had burnt and pillaged wherever they had paffed ; and that, if it difpleafed the king, he might come and amend it ; for they would tarry there as long as it pleafed them. When the council of the king of England heard the anfwer, he ordered it to be proclaimed, that each ihould take up his quarters where he wTas, without quitting the ground or his arms: they therefore lay that night very uncomfortably upon the hard ground, among rocks and flones, with their armour on ; nor could they get any flakes for the purpofe of tying their horfes, or procure either litter, or forage, or any bufhes to make fires. The Scots, feeing the Englifh thus take up their quarters, ordered part of the army to remain where the battalions had been drawn up ; and the re minder retired to their huts, where they made mar


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