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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1
page 282



The Flemings were much rejoiced at this, for they thought they ihould beftrong çnough to conquer it j and if it were once under the prote&ion of the king of England, they could eafily recover Lille, Douay, Bethune, and all their dependencies, which ofright belonged to the country of Flanders. The lords and the councils were ftill at Ghent, Much wondering why thofe of the country of Hainault had not come to this conference; but fuch proper excufes were fent, that the king and the others were fatisfied. Things remained on this footing, when the lords took their leave, and fet out for their own country. The king of England went to Antwerp ; but the queen remained with her train at Ghent, where ihe was often vifited and comforted by Jacob von Artaveld and other lords and ladies of Ghent. The king left in Flanders the earls of Salifbury and of Suffolk, who went to the town of Ypres, which they garrifoned, and thence harafied much thofe of Lifle and its environs. . When the king's veffel was ready, he embarked with a numerous attendance at Antwerp, and failed for London, where he arrived about St. Andrew's day, 1339, and was joyfully received by his fubjeâs, v who were anxious for his return. Great complaints were made to him of the ravages which the Normans, Picards, and Spaniards had committed at Southampton ; upon which he anfwered, that, whenever it came to his turn, he would make them pay dearly for it—and he kept his word before the end of that year. M 3 CHAP.


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