Help us create a biggest collection of medieval chronicles and manuscripts on line.
#   A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z 
Medieval chronicles, historical sources, history of middle ages, texts and studies

SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1

DOWNLOAD THE FULL BOOK

DOWNLOAD THE ONLY FULL EDITIONS of

Sir John Froissart's Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the Ajoining Countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV in 12 volumes 

Chronicles of Enguerrand De Monstrelet (Sir John Froissart's Chronicles continuation) in 13 volumes 

 
 
 
  Previousall pages

Next  

SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1
page 287



teigne upon the Scheld ; the highfteward of Car-» caifonne in the town of St. Amand ; fir Aimery de Poiâiers in Douay ; thç lord Gallois de la Baufme, the lord of Villars, the marihal of Mirepoix, and the lord of Marnçil, in the city of Cambray. Thefe knights, as well as the efquires and foldiers, defired nothing more ardently than permiffion to enter -Hainault to pillage and deftroy it. The bifliop of Cambray, who had retired to Paris, being near the king's perfon, complained, whenever he found a fit. opportunity, of the damage the Hainaulters had occafioned him, and that they had burnt and deftroyed* for him more than any others would have done; fo that the king at laft gave his confient for the foldiers in the county of Cambray to make an invafion, and over-run the country of Hainault. Then the garrifon of Cambray preparedfixhunT dred men at arms for this incurfion, and they fent out on a Saturday at nightfall from Cambray thofe that were ordered for it. At the fame hour thofe from Malç-maifon began their march. The two detachments met on the road, and came to the town of Hafpres, which was a large handfome town, though not fortified ; nor had the inhabitants any fear, for they had never received the fmalleft notice of war being declared againft the country. Th e French, on entering the town, found every" one within doors. Having taken and pillaged what they pleafed, they burnt the town fo completely, that nothing but th e walls remained. In Hafpres there was a priory of black monks, that was dependant on that of St. Waas in Arras j the


  Previous First Next  
 
 
 
 
 

"Medievalist" is an educational project designed as a digital collection of chronicles, documents and studies related to the middle age history. All materials from this site are permitted for non commersial use unless otherwise indicated. If you reduplicate documents from here you have to indicate "Medievalist" as a source and place link to us.
 
              Яндекс.Метрика