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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1
page 337



the country round about ; and the mountain had fo fteep an afcent, that few can go up it without flop ping twice or thrice. The governor of it at that time was a gallant Engliih knight, called fir Walter Limoufin, brother german to him who bad fo gallantly defended the iaflle of Thin TEveque againft the French. A bold thought came into fir William Douglas's Xmnd, which he mentioned to his companions, the earl of Dunbar, fir Robert Frafer, who had been tutor to king David of Scotland, and Alexander Ramfay, who all agreed to try to execute it. They collected upwards of two hundred lances of Highlanders, went to fea, and purchafed oats, oatmeal, coal, and ftraw, and landed peaceably at a port about three miles from the caftle of Edinburgh, which had made a ftronger refiftance than all the other cailles. When they had armed themfelves, they iflued forth in the night time ; and having chofen ten or twelve from among them, in whom they had the greateft confidence, they dreffed them in old threadbare clothes, with torn hats, like poor tradefmen, and loaded twelve fmall horfes, with a fack to each filled wkh oats, meal, or ccal ; they then placed the reft m ambtrfcade in an old abbey that was ruined «od uninhabited, dofe to the foot of the mountain, on which the calile was iituate. At daybreak, thefe merchants, who were privily armed, took the road with their horfes the very beft way they could towards the caftle. When they had got about half way up the hill, fir William Douglas 6 and


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