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SIR JOHN FROISSART Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1

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SIR JOHN FROISSART
Chronicles of England, France, Spain and the adjoining countries from the latter part of the reign of Edward II to the coronation of Henry IV. Vol.1
page 361



France, Picardy, Burgundy, and Normandy, agreed to it, without any exception ; and this truce was to take place immediately in the armies of France and England. The two kings alfo were to fend four or five noble perfonages to Arras, where the pope was to fend as many legates ; and to whatever thefe perfons ihould determine upon they promifed moifc faithfully to accede. One of the conditions of this truce was, that each perfon ihould rétain whatever he had got in his poiTeflion. * . , The truce was immediately proclaimed in each army, to the great joy of the Brabanters, who were heartily tired of the fiege. The day after, at day-break, tents and pavilions Were (truck, waggons loaded, and every one in motion to depart ; fo that any one who had been there before, and faw this, might have hailed anew aera.. Thus the good city of Tournay remained unhurt, but it had a narrow* efcape ; for there were at that time no more provifions in it than would have been fufficient for three or four days. , The Brabanters began their march immediately, for they were very impatient to return. The king of England fet out fore againft his will, but it behoved him to confent to the will of others, and to agree to their councils. The king of France could riot well remainlonger where he was, from the great ftench of the dead cattle, and from the exceffive heat of the: weather.


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